Ottawa

Canadian Parliament

After the War Museum, I finally got a chance to tour Parliament! While the tour is free, it can be tough to get tickets. So, I suggest arriving as soon as the ticket office opens!

As a political science student, I really enjoyed studying Parliament and the structure of Canada’s legislature. I learned a lot, and it caused a lot of critical thinking about the various systems and pros and cons of each.

Blocs of Parliament

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The Centennial Flame outside of Parliament, which commemorates Canada’s 100th anniversary as a Confederation.

 

Video of the inside of the library, which is the only standing part of the original Parliament after a 1916 fire burned the rest of the building.

At the top of the Peace Tower, which is a 306.5 foot clock tower situated in the center of the Centre Block of the Canadian Parliament buildings.

Video of the three Parliament blocks from outside of Centre Block.

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Ottawa

Royal Canadian Mint

Tuesday, May 22, started with a trip to Parliament Hill to pick up free tour tickets at 90 Wellington. Well, despite arriving an hour after they opened, they had no more tours until 6:30! So, I picked up a ticket and went on my way to other activities.

The first being the Royal Canadian Mint! Now, if you remember my post for yesterday, I had already tried to go to the Mint….and landed myself confused and lost in the National Gallery of Canada!Royal_Canadian_Mint_Logo_(2013-).svg

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I was only able to take photos outside and in the gift shop, so I don’t have a lot to show, and there’s not a lot online either! The tour was really interesting and lasted about 45 minutes. It only cost $6 CAD (about $4.65 USD), which was also really great. This is definitely a tour I recommend!

There are mints located in both Ottawa and Winnipeg. The Ottawa Mint makes collection coins and investment coins, while the Winnipeg Mint makes circulation coins and oversees the production of bills. While they do change the inside as technology changes, the outside is preserved in its castle-like form.

 

The first photo is the outside of the Mint, the second photo is just a moose from the gift shop, and the bottom photo is me holding 28 pounds of gold, worth $650,000!

Also look at this cute and kinda weird Canadian maple leaf doll I got:

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So, I guess when I was dropped off outside the National Gallery, I didn’t realize that the Mint was behind me — I walked away from it and kept looking and looking, when it was only three minutes behind me! Eh, it’s funny to laugh about now. Wasn’t so funny when I was lost and didn’t know why!

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Next….onto the Bank of Canada!